Friday, January 1, 2010

#0101hk: Visual Imagery of Hong Kong Protests Jan 1 2010

I've been posting selections from a series of photos shared via Twitter from demonstrations in Hong Kong on January 1, 2010. The images were aggregated with the term #0101hk.

(Background of the January 1, 2010, Hong Kong New Year's protests on Wikipedia.)


The New Face of Social Protest In Hong Kong

Flag Symbolism in Hong Kong

Long-suffering and Faceless in Hong Kong

HK's Goddess of Democracy

HK: No More Con Games

I {heart} HK

Latest HK Prohibition

Black and White in HK

Related posts



Beijing has an intuitive understanding that, in a way that is determined by conditions of unequal information, it can monolithically dictate terms, and that other, "distributed," parties will be hard-pressed to stand up to those terms. Specifically, Beijing observes a cynical cost/benefit calculus which says, "Sure, a few players will always wise up and exercise their options to move away from us; but, by and large, everyone else is too paralyzed to move."

(See Merry Christmas, Mr. Liu: The Prisoner's Dilemma in China)






Despite the difficulties associated with engaging in effective solidarity with dissidents in China, it is important to make the effort. A fundamental tenet of all peace and justice activism is that if we have the power to speak we can do anything, and if "they" succeed in shutting us up, it's the beginning of the end.

(See What is the US Peace and Justice Movement Doing for Dissidents in China?)











"How can it be that no one is speaking directly to what happened?" I wondered. "Should I say something? Is it just me? Can it be possible that most people aren't like me, tremendously troubled by how we should respond to what has happened in China?"

(See Remember June 4)











Recent events have not only proved that dissent is alive and well in Hong Kong, but that creative resistance is a Hong Kong strong suit. The June 4, 2014, commemoration of the Tiananmen Massacre in Hong Kong included these images . . .

(See Hong Kong Keeping the Memory of June 4 Alive (Who Knew?) )